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Atomic Alert!: Confronting ‘The Bomb’ in the New Atomic Age Exhibit Opens Sept. 7

Atomic Alert!: Confronting ‘The Bomb’ in the New Atomic Age, a free traveling exhibition designed by Overland Traveling Exhibits, opens Sept. 7 at the Two Mississippi Museums and will be on display through Nov. 8. The exhibition explores the history of the Federal Civil Defense Administration (FCDA) established to prepare Americans for the perils of the new Atomic Age.

In August 1945, in the waning days of World War II, the United States dropped two atomic bombs on cities in Japan. Four years later, the Soviet Union tested its first atomic weapon, and the Cold War began. Nuclear testing made its way to Mississippi through the detonation of two nuclear devices outside of Hattiesburg. The first test, Project Salmon, occurred in October 1964 and, roughly two years later, Project Sterling followed, which used a smaller bomb in the cavity left behind by the first blast.

“The Two Mississippi Museums are excited to share this free, special exhibit,” said Michael Morris, director of the Two Mississippi Museums. “We welcome the public to explore and learn about Mississippi’s role in nuclear testing during the Atomic Age.”

The exhibition puts a special focus on the educational and volunteer programs of the FCDA, which encouraged the building of bomb shelters, the establishment of neighborhood wardens, and taught children to “duck and cover.” Atomic Alert! includes a striking artistic interpretation of the impact of a nuclear blast, featuring the silhouette of a bomb roughly the size and shape of the bombs dropped in World War II.

Visitors can immerse themselves in the era with Mississippi artifacts that tell the story of the state’s response to nuclear threat, including stocking civil defense hospital supplies. Other exhibit artifacts include a Geiger counter used to detect ionizing radiation on objects at ground level and a booklet that instructed families who did not have designated shelters on how to construct a shelter within their home.

Atomic Alert!: Confronting ‘The Bomb’ in the New Atomic Age programming includes two free History Is Lunch programs on Sept. 25 and Oct. 9 and two free gallery talks on Oct. 10 and Oct. 22.

Atomic Alert! was developed, designed, built, and toured by Overland Traveling Exhibits and independent Atomic Age scholar Michael Scheibach. Founding institutions for the exhibition include the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County in Moorhead, Minnesota.

For more information, go to https://2mm.mdah.ms.gov/atomic-alert or call 601-576-6850. 

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Tribal Chief Ben Elected to MDAH Board of Trustees

Tribal Chief Cyrus Ben, the fifth democratically elected chief of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, has been elected to the board of trustees of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH). The action took place at the regular meeting of the MDAH Board of Trustees on Friday, July 12. His nomination will be submitted to the Mississippi State Senate for confirmation.

Chief Ben will be the first Native American and member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians elected to the MDAH Board of Trustees.

“Chief Ben brings an excellent background of public service and leadership experience,” said Spence Flatgard, MDAH Board of Trustees president. “MDAH will benefit greatly from his expertise and dedication.  We are thrilled to have him on our Board.”

A lifelong resident of the Pearl River community, Chief Ben has a 15-year record of public service and leadership to the Choctaw Tribal government, including eight years as the Tribal Council representative for the Pearl River community. He was elected as Tribal Chief in July 2019 and re-elected in 2023. He also served on the Mississippi State Flag Commission, which oversaw the selection of the new state flag that includes a symbol of native territory before statehood.

Chief Ben holds a bachelor’s degree from Mississippi College and an associate’s degree from East Central Community College. 

A member of the Mississippi USA Semiquincentennial Commission that will commemorate the 250th anniversary of the United States in 2026, Chief Ben is also a board member of the Mississippi Commission for Volunteer Service and serves as a delegate on the Health Resources and Services Administration Tribal Advisory Council, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Center for Indigenous Innovation and Health Equity Tribal Advisory Committee.
Board nominees must be confirmed by the state Senate. Members serve six-year terms. Other members of the board of trustees are Flatgard of Ridgeland, president; Nancy Carpenter of Columbus, vice president; Reginald Buckley of Jackson; Carter Burns of Natchez; Betsey Hamilton of New Albany; Mark E. Keenum of Starkville; Lucius M. Lampton of Magnolia; and TJ Taylor of Madison. 
 

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. The department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, state and local government records management, and publications.  For more information, call 601-576-6850 or email info@mdah.ms.gov.  
 

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MDAH Announces New Director of the Eudora Welty House & Garden

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH) has named Sara Nordin the new director of the Eudora Welty House & Garden (EWHG) in Jackson, Mississippi. The EWHG museum is the home of acclaimed author Eudora Welty, who wrote numerous award-winning fiction and essays. The EWHG opened to the public in 2006 and has drawn visitors throughout the state and across the world.

“The Eudora Welty House & Garden is an important part of our literary history that has spoken to many people. I look forward to building its success,” said Nordin.

Nordin earned her bachelor’s degree from Auburn University, where she studied art history and design. Her career has included roles in high-end hospitality management at the historic Roosevelt New Orleans hotel and cultural education and programming at the Kentuck Knob, a Frank Lloyd Wright house museum.

In 2023, Nordin began her career at MDAH as the director of visitor experiences at the Two Mississippi Museums. She supervised front desk operations, coordinated volunteers and group tours, and spearheaded strategic enhancement of visitor engagement.

“I am looking forward to the great work Sara will continue at the Eudora Welty House & Garden,” said Cindy Gardner, division director, MDAH Museum Division. “She brings a strong background in visitor engagement development, so I have no doubt that the site will continue to thrive under her capable leadership.” 
 
Located at 1119 Pinehurst St. in Jackson, the EWHG Visitor Center is free and open to the public Tuesday–Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Parking can be found alongside 1109 Pinehurst St. To book a tour or for more information, call 601-353-7762, visit , or email info@eudoraweltyhouse.com.
 

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Mississippi Students Excel at National History Day Contest

Thirty-six students from across Mississippi represented the state at the 2024 National History Day (NHD) contest hosted at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland. NHD is a program for middle and high school students to research, produce, and present a historical research project. Winners at the state level competition, Mississippi History Day (MDH) hosted by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH), progress to NHD. 

I am incredibly proud of our Mississippi students for showing how intelligent and creative they are on the national stage,” said MDAH outreach programs coordinator Bently Cochran. We look forward to next year as we expand the program and strive to be bigger and better than ever.”  

NHD affiliates include all fifty states and the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, and international schools in Europe and Asia. About 3,000 students from across the United States and overseas compete each June.

Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science (MSMS) senior Harrison Shao won first place in the senior paper category for From Small Wonder to Big Salvation: How the Mass Production of Penicillin Became Possible in the Early 1940s. Shao's teacher, Kayla Hester, attended NHD with Shao and three other students from MSMS. 

Shao is the first Mississippi student to win first place at NHD. He was also one of four students in the nation who won the National History Academy Scholarship worth $10,000.  

Starkville High School (SHS) sophomore Walter Giesen placed eighth in the individual documentary category for Mississippi Turning: The Pivotal Role of School Desegregation in a Southern Town. Giesen's teachers, Craig and Maggie Wood, attended NHD with Giesen and nine other students from SHS. 

Additionally, MSMS sophomore Keylee Lang was one of forty-eight competitors to have their project exhibited at the National Museum of American History during NHD. Lang’s senior individual project is titled “The Modern Woman: How Flappers Changed Society’s Views of Women.”  

Mississippi students averaged in the top fifty percent in the nation at the competition in their first-round rooms, a first for the state. Among these NHD participants were: Samar Rahimi, grade eleven, and Dylan Michael Wiley, grade twelve, MSMS; Amy Choi, grade nine, Sachiko Clay, Jimin Kim, Mirae Nishikawa, and Claire Rhee, grade ten, Johnny Ford, grade eleven, Chyla Hanna, Jenna Holder, and Lindy Peterson, grade twelve, SHS; Trinity Collins and Heidi Overstreet, grade eleven, William Hardwick, Lucas Houston, and William Warfield, grade twelve, Hernando High School; Londyn Kirkland, Marlasha Johnson, Theo Milnor, Cambreh Spires, and Jatayla Williams, grade ten, Tougaloo Early College High School. 

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Lanterns on the Levee Original Manuscript Donated to MDAH

The estate of William Alexander Percy has donated the original handwritten manuscript of Percy's 1941 autobiography and bestseller, Lanterns on the Levee: Recollections of a Planter's Son, to the Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH).  

Born May 14, 1885, in Greenville, Percy was a Harvard Law School graduate, poet, and owner of Trail Lake Planting Co. In Lanterns on the Levee, Percy reflects on pivotal events such as the devastating Mississippi River flood of 1927, as well as the profound societal transformations that occurred in the South during the Progressive Era, World War I, and the Great Depression. Percy died on January 21, 1942, in Greenville at age 56.  

“MDAH is grateful to the Percy family for this generous donation to the archives,” said MDAH director Katie Blount. “Lanterns on the Levee is a fascinating and important book, and we are thrilled to be able to offer researchers access to the author’s original handwritten manuscript. This addition complements the Percy Family Papers at MDAH, which also includes the correspondence and papers of William Alexander Percy and his father Sen. LeRoy Percy, providing unique insight into Delta culture and society of the day.” 

The donation consists of nine notebooks of the manuscript of Lanterns on the Levee, in addition to sheet music with Percy's poetry set to musical compositions, and four letters from Percy to Gerstle Mack, biographer of Paul Cezanne, in which he responds to Mack’s criticisms of his manuscript.  

While the collection is being processed, researchers who want to view the manuscript may request access by contacting the archival curator at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building; however, the Percy Family Papers are currently available for research in the archival reading room.  

The MDAH collection also contains manuscripts by other prominent Mississippi authors, including the manuscripts of Eudora Welty novels and short story collections, such as Delta Wedding and A Curtain of Green, and the typescripts of plays by Beth Henley, including The Miss Firecracker Contest, Crimes of the Heart, and The Wake. 

MDAH was founded in 1902 to collect, preserve, and provide access to the archival resources of the state. It is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States.  

For more information, call 601-576-6876 or email refdesk@mdah.ms.gov. 

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Local Government Records Committee Meeting

The local government records committee will review, approve, disapprove, amend, or modify records control schedules for all counties and municipalities on Tuesday, July 16, at 10:30 a.m. Once approved, schedules shall have the force of effect of law.

Written comments must be presented no less than five (5) days before the scheduled meeting by mail or personal delivery to the attention of the Director of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History at 200 North Street, Jackson, MS 39201. This is in accordance with information provided at https://www.mdah.ms.gov/local-government#public_notice

Join this Mississippi State Records Committee Meeting via Zoom from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/85300408623?pwd=AVjebEoDyCL3DwlF8vLVHrJRjxIMeY.1

Meeting ID: 853 0040 8623

Passcode: 290578

Or Telephone: Dial: USA (312) 626-6799 (Chicago) Find local numbers:

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HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding Division Sponsors Free Admission at the Two Mississippi Museums in Honor of Juneteenth

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division is sponsoring free admission to the Two Mississippi Museums  in honor of Juneteenth on Wednesday, June 19.  

“We are grateful to Ingalls Shipbuilding for making it possible for so many Mississippians to visit the Two Mississippi Museums and celebrate emancipation in the United States,” said Katie Blount, director of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. 

Juneteenth National Independence Day became a federal holiday in 2021, commemorating the emancipation of enslaved people at the end of the Civil War. 

According to the US Census, 436,631 Black men, women, and children—55 percent of Mississippi's population—were enslaved when the Civil War began. The Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum illustrate how the state’s economy thrived on the global demand for cotton and how the injustice of slavery led to the war. 

The partnership between Ingalls Shipbuilding and the Two Mississippi Museums underscores the joint commitment to community and education, offering residents of Mississippi and visitors an opportunity to explore and make Mississippi’s shared history accessible to everyone.  

“By sponsoring admission to the Two Mississippi Museums, Ingalls Shipbuilding hopes this inspires reflection, learning, and a deeper appreciation for the significance of Juneteenth,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporate Stewardship and Community Relations Manager Lisa Bradley. 
In addition to free admission all day, there will be a Juneteenth Jubilee program from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Two Mississippi Museums.  

Celebrating Black empowerment and community, this evening program will feature a variety of activities, including Juneteenth-themed crafts, card and yard games, and Juneteenth-themed tours at 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. In addition, the program will feature a line dance workshop by Aaron Honeysuckle at 5:30 p.m., and performances by the Master’s Touch DrumLine, LLC, Jasmine JT Thomas, Cliffton Cotten, and the Anderson United Methodist Church youth dance ministry. Fratelli Italian Ice will also be on site to serve sweet treats. 

Employing more than 11,000 people, Ingalls Shipbuilding is the largest manufacturing employer in Mississippi. For 85 years from its location in Pascagoula, Ingalls has designed, built, and maintained amphibious ships, destroyers, and cutters for the US Navy and US Coast Guard. 

The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the Museum of Mississippi History are in downtown Jackson at 222 North Street.  Free parking can be found alongside North Street near the Entergy Plaza or in the Two Mississippi Museums visitor garage on Jefferson Street. For more information, call 601-576-6850 or email info@mdah.ms.gov.  

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What to Know Before You Go to Mississippi Makers Fest at the Two Mississippi Museums

Mississippi blues and Grammy award-winning artist Christone “Kingfish” Ingram will headline the free 2024 Mississippi Makers Fest—a music, food, and arts festival sponsored by Nissan—at the Two Mississippi Museums from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, May 11. Additional musical performers include Hud & The Hurricane and American Blonde. Concerts start at 4 p.m.

The free event will kick off the 2024 summer season with the Mississippi Department of Archives and History’s third annual Mississippi Makers Fest. More than 40 vendors and food trucks will gather to celebrate Mississippi’s creativity. Visitors can look forward to handcrafted pottery, paintings, charcuterie boards, jewelry, and more from local vendors. Mini Makers also returns, full of make-and-take crafts and activities for children, including face painting.  

The 2024 Makers Fest title sponsor is Nissan, with additional support from sponsors Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi, Nancy and Ray Neilsen, StateStreet Group, Visit Mississippi, Capital City Beverages, the Foundation for Mississippi History, Cathead Distillery, Lucid Ink, and radio stations Y101, 102.1 The Box, Blues 93.1, Your Hometown Country US96, Mix 98.7, and 93.5 The Legend. 

Blankets and one collapsible lawn chair per person are allowed. Only clear bags will be allowed through security—including purses, fanny packs, diaper bags, and all other bags.  

The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the Museum of Mississippi History are in downtown Jackson at 222 North Street. Access to public parking is available at the Mississippi State Fairgrounds on Jefferson Street at Amite Street.

For more information on Mississippi Makers Fest, join the event at @MSMakersFest, visit msmakersfest.mdah.ms.gov, or email info@mississippimakersfest.com. Click here to see a full list of vendors. 

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Higher Purpose Co. to Sponsor Free Weekend at Two Mississippi Museums  

Higher Purpose Co. is sponsoring free admission to the Two Mississippi Museums Friday, May 31, through Sunday, June 2, to commemorate the 60th anniversary of Freedom Summer.

“We are grateful to Higher Purpose Co. for making it possible for people to visit the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum free of charge,” said Katie Blount, director of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. “Visitors will learn about the importance of Freedom Summer and its critical role in the Civil Rights Movement.”

The statewide economic opportunity nonprofit Higher Purpose Co. continues to expand access to powerful stories at the museums as part of its arts and culture strategy. This Freedom Summer Free Weekend marks the third consecutive year HPC has offered free admission to museum guests.

“Higher Purpose Co. is excited to deepen our relationship with MDAH and collaborate on this commemorative event,” said Tim Lampkin, founder and chief executive officer of Higher Purpose Co. “As we gather for a Freedom Summer Free Weekend at the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, we honor the stories of resilience and triumph that have shaped our history. Through storytelling, we not only commemorate the past but also inspire a new generation of Black entrepreneurs to forge their own paths towards economic empowerment.”

Launched in June 1964, the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign designed to help Black Mississippians register to vote and enhance their education by enlisting the help of college students. During Freedom Summer, three civil rights workers—James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner—were murdered. Nonetheless, the combined efforts of civil rights groups, college students, local people—and media coverage of the violence—led to the passage of the national legislation, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, assisting in the dismantling of Jim Crow segregation.

Staff at the Two Mississippi Museums will offer visitors themed tours about Freedom Summer at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Friday, May 31, and Saturday, June 1, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, June 2. On Sunday afternoon from 2 to 3 p.m., the Anderson United Methodist Church Choir will provide a concert.

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Students Compete in Annual Mississippi History Day Competition at Two Mississippi Museums

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH) hosted the 2024 Mississippi History Day competition at the Two Mississippi Museums on Saturday, April 20. The competition drew middle and high school students from across the state. 

Mississippi History Day (MHD), the state’s National History Day (NHD) affiliate, is a cross-curriculum program focusing on in-depth research and critical analysis. While the program’s basis is in history, students presented topics related to a variety of subjects, such as science, arts, mathematics, foreign language, and culture. The event encourages students to conduct primary and secondary source research through archives, digital archives, libraries, museums, and historic sites. 

“Mississippi History Day provides a unique opportunity for students to study history they are interested in and present it in a way they are comfortable with. Seeing students from across the state show off their research in creative ways is always inspiring and this year was no different. It was a great event for all involved,” said Al Wheat, MDAH director of education and MHD affiliate coordinator. 

Sixty-three students competed in thirty-seven projects at MHD, having advanced from the regional competition to the state event. Students participated in one of five categories, organized in two separate divisions, Junior Division (grades 6–8) and Senior Division (grades 9–12). The categories have individual and group options, except for the paper category. Group teams were comprised of up to five members. 

First and second place finishers in each category at MHD qualify for the NHD National Contest in June 2024. Students at the state and national level can also win monetary prizes through special awards. 

2024 Mississippi History Day winners:  

Exhibits  

  • Senior Individual First Place (eligible for nationals): Keylee Lang, Starkville High School, The Modern Woman: How Flappers Changed Society’s Views on Women. 

  • Senior Individual Second Place (eligible for nationals): Joey Knight, Mississippi School for Math and Science, The Great Amphibious Landing at Inchon.  

  • Senior Individual Alternate: Londyn Kirkland, Tougaloo Early College High School, Mississippi Blues.                                                                    

  • Junior Individual First Place (eligible for nationals): Nathaniel Little, Simpson Central School, Brown v. Board of Ed: A Turning Point in American Education? 

  • Senior Group First Place (eligible for nationals): William Hardwick, Lucas Houston, and William Warfield, Hernando High School, Meiji: Japan’s Transformation into a Global Power.  

  • Senior Group Second Place (eligible for nationals): Trinity Collins and Heidi Overstreet, Hernando High School, Women’s March on Versailles.  

  • Senior Group Alternate: Stephen Hacker and Colby Marr, Hernando High School, The Wright Brothers.  

  • Junior Group First Place (eligible for nationals): Takiah Gilmore, Breanna Landing, Johnya Johnson, and Rylee Rainey, Simpson Central School, Major Turning Point for Equality.     

Websites  

  • Senior Individual First Place (eligible for nationals): Emily Barnes, Mississippi School for Math and Science, “Shoot For the Stars: How the Space Race Changed Education.” 

  • Senior Individual Second Place (eligible for nationals): Shachiko Clay, Starkville High School, “The Meiji Restoration: How Modernization Transformed Sexuality in Japanese Society.” 

  • Senior Individual Alternate: Theo Milnor, Tougaloo Early College High School, “Pride Was a Riot.” 

  • Senior Group First Place (eligible for nationals): Marlasha Johnson, Cambreah Spires, and Jatalya Williams, Tougaloo Early College High School, “Black Women in the Harlem Renaissance.” 

  • Junior Group First Place (eligible for nationals): Theo Ahn, Peter Buys, and Brendon Seo, Armstrong Middle School (Starkville), “The Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand: How Two Gunshots Altered History Forever.” 

  • Junior Group Second Place (eligible for nationals): Ian Alexander, Owen Crews, Brooks Fulford, and Joseph Thompson, Armstrong Middle School (Starkville), “The Collapse of the Indestructible: How the Fall of Constantinople Altered History.”  

Documentaries  

  • Senior Individual First Place (eligible for nationals): Samar Rahimi, Mississippi School for Math and Science, The Iranian Hostage Crisis: A Multi-Perspective Review. 

  • Senior Individual Second Place (eligible for nationals): Walter Giesen, Starkville High School, Mississippi Turning: How School Desegregation Redefined a Southern Town.  

  • Senior Individual Alternate: Eduardo Gonzalez-Orozco, Starkville High School, The Russian Revolution: The Rise of Communism. 

  • Senior Group First Place (eligible for nationals): Johnny Ford, Chyla Hanna, Jenna Holder, and Lindy Peterson, Starkville High School, Plague and Progress: How the Black Death Created a Turning Point in Medicine

  • Senior Group Second Place (eligible for nationals): Amy Choi, Jimin Kim, Mirae Nishikawa, and Claire Rhee, Starkville High School, The Jungle: How One Book Impacted the Future of Food and Labor Safety Laws. 

  • Senior Group Alternate: Jennifer Bui, Ean Choi, Lisa Seid, and Vincent Wang, Mississippi School for Math and Science, Infamous Investigation: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study.  

Performance  

  • Senior Individual First Place (eligible for nationals): Dylan Wiley, Mississippi School for Math and Science, The Forgotten Valor: Contributions of African American Soldiers in the Civil War and the First World Frontiers from Lowndes County.  

  • Junior Group First Place (eligible for nationals): Jerney Gray, Italiah Ross, Aniya Robinson, and Elize’a Scott, Whitten Middle School (Jackson), Freed With No Knowledge  

Paper 

  • Senior First Place (eligible for nationals): Harrison Shao, Mississippi School for Math and Science, “From Small Wonder to Big Salvation: How the Mass Production of Penicillin Became Possible in the Early 1940s.” 

  • Senior Second Place (eligible for nationals): Cohen Suttles, Mississippi School for Math and Science, “The Emmitt Till Generation.”  

  • Senior Alternate: Allswell Nukpezah, Starkville High School, “Exploring Ghanaian Independence as a Turning Point in Pan-African History.” 

  • Junior 1st Place (eligible for nationals): Ian Jung, Armstrong Middle School (Starkville), “A Treaty and a Dictator: How the Treaty of Versailles Influenced the Rise of Hitler.”   

National History Day State Contest Special Awards 

  • Best Project in Mississippi History: Cohen Suttles, Mississippi School for Math and Science, “The Emmett Till Generation.” 

  • Best Project in Maritime History: Joey Knight, Mississippi School for Math and Science, “The Great Amphibious Landing at Inchon.”  

  • Best Project in Civil War History: Dylan Micheal Wiley, Mississippi School for Math and Science, “The Forgotten Valor: Contributions of African American Soldiers in the Civil War and the First World Frontiers from Lowndes County.”  

  • Reflecting Mississippi History Award: Walter Giesen, Starkville High School, “Mississippi Turning: How School Desegregation Redefined a Southern Town.” 

  • Reflecting Mississippi History Award: Londyn Kirkland, Tougaloo Early College High School, “Mississippi Blues.”  

  • Best Project in Women’s History: Keylee Lang, Starkville High School, “The Modern Woman: How Flappers Changed Society's Views of Women.” 

  • Best Project in Black History: Marlasha Johnson, Cambreh Spires, and Jatalya Williams, Tougaloo Early College High School, “Black Women in the Harlem Renaissance.” 

  • Best Project in Military History: Theo Ahn, Peter Buys, and Brendan Seo, Armstrong Middle School (Starkville), “The Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand: How Two Gunshots Altered History Forever.” 

  • Best Project in Gulf South History: Khloe Robinson, Tougaloo Early College High School, “The Evolution of Lynchings in Mississippi.”  

  • Best Project in Archival History: Sachiko Clay, Starkville High School, “The Meiji Restoration: How Modernization Transformed Sexuality in Japanese Society.” 

Patricia Behring Teacher of the Year for Mississippi 

  • Senior Division: Alexandria Drake, Tougaloo Early College High School 

  • Junior Division: Abigail Myers, Simpson Central School  

Sponsored special awards with a prize of $150 each included: Best in Military History, provided by The Dale Center for the Study of War and Society at the University of Southern Mississippi; Best in Black History and Woman's History, provided by The School of Interdisciplinary Studies and Professional Development at the University of Southern Mississippi; Best in Gulf South History, provided by The Center for the Study of the Gulf South at the University of Southern Mississippi; Best in Archival History, provided by the Society of Mississippi Archivists; Two Reflecting Mississippi Awards, provided by the Mississippi Humanities Council; Best in Mississippi History, provided by the Mississippi Historical Society; Best in Maritime History, provided by the National Maritime Historical Society; Best in Civil War History, provided by Mississippi State University; Two Patricia Behring Teacher of the Year Awards, provided by Patricia Behring and National History Day. 

Each teacher who received the Patricia Behring Teacher of the Year Award received $500 and a chance to compete on the national level for $10,000. 

NHD is a non-profit organization based in College Park, Maryland, which seeks to improve the teaching and learning of history. Established in 1974, the National History Day Contest engages more than half a million students every year in conducting original research on historical topics of interest. Projects compete first at the local and affiliate levels, where the top entries are invited to the National Contest at the University of Maryland at College Park. NHD is sponsored in part by HISTORY®, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Park Service, The Better Angels Society, and the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation. 

MDAH was founded in 1902 to collect, preserve, and provide access to the archival resources of the state. The commitment to preservation continues today through the work of the department’s five divisions. By preserving Mississippi’s diverse historic resources and sharing them with people around the world, MDAH inspires the discovery of stories that connect our lives and shape our future. 

Images of winners are available on the MHD Facebook page.

For more information on Mississippi History Day, please call 601-576-6850 or email info@mdah.gov

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