Early Natchez: Concord

On January 19, 2011, in Artifacts, Photographs, by Amanda
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This post is the final part of a short series of items from the collection related to the early days of Natchez, one of the early settlements in Mississippi and the center of government and society during the territorial years (1798-1817) and early days of statehood.

PI/CI/N38.3.65
Concord, Natchez, 189-. Call Number: PI/CI/N38.3 Item 65 (MDAH Collection)

This is “Concord,” built in 1789 by Don Manuel de Gayoso, Spanish governor of the Natchez region. The governor named the home “Concord” because it symbolized the fact that people from different countries lived together in “concord” in the Natchez area. The occupants of the home entertained many notable people of the day, including territorial governor Winthrop Sargeant, Aaron Burr, and Jefferson Davis. The last event held there was hosted by the Duke and Duchess of Manchester. Concord burned in 1901. The only parts remaining were the curved marble staircase in the front and a brick outbuilding (the staircase was dismantled in the late 1970s). Some pieces of furniture and a few of the marble mantles were also saved from the blaze.

Read more about Concord, including the text of a newspaper article published shortly after the fire in this article from the Preservation in Mississippi blog.

Key from Concord. Accession number: 1960.44.5 (Museum of Mississippi History Collection)

Key from Concord. Accession number: 1960.44.5 (Museum of Mississippi History Collection)

E.B. Baker donated these Concord artifacts to MDAH in 1917. Artifacts in the collection of the Museum of Mississippi History are available for viewing by appointment only. Please contact Cindy Gardner, Director of Collections or Nan Prince, Asst. Director of Collections by email to schedule an appointment.

Newel post ornament from step leading to front entrance of Concord. Accession number: 1960.44.2 (Museum of Mississippi Collection)

Newel post ornament from step leading to front entrance of Concord. Accession number: 1960.44.2 (Museum of Mississippi Collection)

Connelly’s Tavern on Ellicott’s Hill, exterior, Natchez, Miss. Call Number: PI/2004.0011 (MDAH Collection)

Connelly’s Tavern on Ellicott’s Hill, exterior, Natchez, Miss. Call Number: PI/2004.0011 (MDAH Collection)

Concord originally looked similar to this house on Ellicott’s Hill in Natchez.
Sources:
“Concord,” Subject File, MDAH.

Westley F. Busbee, Jr., Mississippi: A History (Wheeling, Illinois: Harlan Davidson, Inc., 2005), 47.

The Coker House, continued

On August 26, 2010, in Museums & Historic Sites, by Amanda
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Today, we continue with the Coker House, built in 1852 near Edwards in Hinds County. These images show the interior of the house before and after the MDAH restoration of 2008-09. For exterior photographs and a little history, see the previous post.

This image shows the wide center hallway that was a common feature in houses of that era.

Devastation wrought by time and the elements.

You can see the elements original to the house above–the mantle and doors.

The Coker House is located about 3 miles east of Edwards on Highway 467 in front of the Cal-Maine Foods plant. Visitors are welcome from sunup to sundown. There is no charge. For more information, call 601-446-6502 or email the Historic Properties division.

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The Coker House, near Edwards (Hinds County), was restored by MDAH in 2008-09. These images show the structure prior to restoration and the final result after completion of the project. Located on the Champion Hill Civil War battlefield, the Coker House sustained fire from Federal and Confederate artillery and served as a field hospital during the battle on May 16, 1863.

The house was built in 1852 by the Coker family in the vernacular Greek Revival style popular at the time. The restoration incorporated as many of the original materials as possible, however as you can see from these images, the house was extremely deteriorated and many parts of it could not be saved.

New interpretive signs, which will be installed at the site later this year, detail the history of the Coker House and tell the story of the Battle of Champion Hill, placing it within the larger context of the Vicksburg Campaign.

The Coker House is located about 3 miles east of Edwards on Highway 467 in front of the Cal-Maine Foods plant. Visitors are welcome from sunup to sundown. There is no charge. For more information, call 601-446-6502 or email the Historic Properties division.

Interior images coming next…

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